Antithesis: Has Facebook ruined romantic relationships?

YES

By Arsh Ankleshwaria

Contributing writer

Facebook ruins love because it causes unneeded publicity, misinterpretation and easy access to former connections that cause confusion in a relationship.

A relationship needs to bloom, but cannot when we slap every intimate aspect of our lives online for the world to see. Pictures, statuses and wallposts that publicize everything about our relationship — where it is heading and what bumps we are experiencing along the way — leaves us privy to others’ opinions.

Dealing with people verbally can be difficult since our generation primarily uses keyboards instead of phones. By not hearing the other person’s voice, a badly worded sentence or even a typo can lead to misinterpretation, which can cause confusion, anger and even breakups.

If one of these does not ruin a relationship, exes always help it along. Keeping in touch with an ex on Facebook makes it easy for someone to get jealous. A short  conversation or an old photo feigning a deeper connection than that in one’s current relationship also leads in the same direction to a breakup.

How is a couple supposed to fall in love when Facebook creates an ever-looming barrier? Escaping its claws involves isolation from the social network, something we seem unable to do.

 

NO

By Mccoy Fidel-Ndubisi

Contributing writer

Facebook cannot be made into a scapegoat. Love is bigger than any one social network to influence, love is an existential entity unlike Facebook, and the proposition itself that “Facebook ruins love” will almost always be an overstatement of an underlying generational issue.

Love is a feeling of ease and happiness towards a significant other. While Facebook does influence the exemplification of love, it is not capable of deciding the ease or difficulty of loving someone. The idea that love’s fate is gloomily connected to Facebook quite frankly is illogical.

For love to be love, it has to be experienced. Facebook exists independent of a person’s knowledge about it. Love’s sprout relies on cultivated physical interpersonal relationships, a trait that is absent from Facebook’s identity and further solidified by our generation’s culture-warped interpretation of how to develop a relationship.

Our culture is the prime reason for love’s decline, not Facebook. Young people nowadays would rather “Facebook” someone instead of meeting them in person. Our generation seems to be willing to go on the first date, maybe the second, but then lose interest altogether.

In other words, Facebook and the distortion of love are effects of our generation’s culture; Facebook’s effects and love’s declining bloom are mutually exclusive.

second but then lose interest altogether.

In other words, Facebook and the distortion of love are effects of our generation’s culture; Facebook’s effects and love’s declining bloom are mutually exclusive.

maybe the second but then lose interest altogether.

In other words, Facebook and the distortion of love are effects of our generation’s culture; Facebook’s effects and love’s declining bloom are mutually exclusive.

generation seems to be willing to go the first date, maybe the second but then lose interest altogether.

In other words, Facebook and the distortion of love are effects of our generation’s culture; Facebook’s effects and love’s declining bloom to me are mutually exclusive.

 

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